Summer 2020 Remote Program

Summer 2020 Remote Program

We are committed to providing our precollege students with an engaging and interactive remote learning experience. The remote experience will still provide our high school students the opportunity to explore their academic interests, while maintaining the academic quality standards of the University. The program will continue to present our students with opportunities to connect with the University community through student panels, undergraduate admission workshops, study breaks, and social activities.

Program Dates:

Summer Scholars 2020 Remote Program (three-week, credit): Saturday, July 4 - Friday, July 24, 2020

UM Academies 2020 Remote Program (two-week, non-credit): Saturday, July 4 - Friday, July 17, 2020

Find our course listings below:
Please note, courses are subject to change. UM reserves the right to limit enrollment, and/or cancel any course. 

Summer Scholars Remote Program | Three-Week, Credit

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  • Business, Leadership and Money – 6 Credit Hours

    Business, Leadership and Money  6 Credit Hours

    Learn business fundamentals and financial wellness strategies for business success. In this academic track students enroll in GBM 101 and Bus 201.

    GBM 101. Fundamentals in Business. 3 Credit Hours.
    This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to the various fields of business knowledge that are essential for successful decision making in the global marketplace. Students will be exposed to lectures in functional areas of business: economics, accounting, finance, and management. In addition to lectures and discussions about some of the core principles in these areas, the curriculum will require students to engage in hands-on activities that will help to familiarize them with the different business fields, and decide if a career in business is right for them.

    Miami Herbert Business School | Instructor(s): Dr. Joan Martinez Evora

    BUS 201. Money. 3 Credit Hours.
    This course is about money and YOU, regardless of your age. How to earn it, borrow it, and save it. How to make it grow, protect it from liability, defer it from income taxation and invest it. You will also learn how to use it in relation to your own business and how to manage it to meet your personal and business financial independence goals.

    This course is for students seeking a practical education on the subject of money and financial wellness. Students will gain a greater sense of proficiency in highly important matters, both from a professional and personal level.

    Miami Herbert Business School | Instructor(s): Prof. Manuel Sicre

    Maximum enrollment: 20
    Prerequisites(s): Algebra

  • Business, Leadership and Real Estate – 6 Credit Hours

    Business, Leadership and Real Estate  6 Credit Hours

    Gain exposure to commercial real estate markets and the various fields of business. Students enroll in GBM 101 and FIN 144.

     

    GBM 101. Fundamentals in Business. 3 Credit Hours.
    This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to the various fields of business knowledge and that are essential for successful decision making in the global marketplace. Students will be exposed to lectures in the functional areas of business: economics, accounting, finance, and management. In addition to lectures and discussions about some of the core principles in these areas, the curriculum will require students to engage in hands-on activities that will help to familiarize them with the different business fields and decide if a career in business is right for them.

    Miami Herbert Business School | Instructor(s): Dr. Joan Martinez Evora

    FIN 144. Real Estate Investment Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.
    This course covers the fundamentals of commercial real estate. The aim of the course is to give you broad exposure to the landscape of commercial real estate markets. After a discussion of the relation between property prices and rents, the first part of the course is focused on property-level analysis of real estate equity as an investment, especially property valuation. This portion will culminate in a valuation case, based on a proposed development project in downtown Miami. After this, we will look at the fundamentals of real estate debt (mortgages) and equity markets (REITs). 

    Miami Herbert Business School | Instructor(s): Dr. Andrea Heuson, Melina Murren Vosse

    Maximum enrollment: 20
    Prerequisites(s): Algebra

  • Explorations in Architecture and Design – 6 Credit Hours

    Explorations in Architecture and Design  6 Credit Hours

    The Explorations in Architecture program is an intensive studio-based three-week experience that introduces students to ideas, principles and methods of exploring architectural and urban problems. By using the School of Architecture curriculum as a model, specially designed courses include instruction in design, drawing, history, theory and representation. Interrelated aspects of architecture, including sustainability, landscape architecture, historic preservation, digital representation and urban design, will assist the student in combining learned information with actual hands-on experience.

    The curriculum consists of two courses; Introduction to Architecture (ARC 109) and Visual Studies (ARC 110) and is taught by the UM School of Architecture’s distinguished faculty. Local professionals are invited to expose the students to the art and business of practice.

    Students will work on a graduated sequence of exercises culminating in a project during each week of the program and a final digital portfolio/book. Resources made available through the School of Architecture will include drafting supplies and equipment, computer aided design software and research resources. Students enroll in ARC 109 and ARC 110.

    ARC 109. Introduction to Architecture. 3 Credit Hours.  
    (Includes Design & Design History) Introduction to architectural ideas and principles including composition, space, form, function, history and methods of exploring architectural and urban design problems. Students will learn the relationship between two dimensional and 3 dimensional spaces through analytical drawing and model making. Course pedagogy includes weekly lectures in history and theory to better inform the design process. This course will encourage intuitive action, rapid visual analysis and interpretation.

    School of Architecture | Instructor(s): Prof. Elizabeth Cronin, Prof. Yasmine Zeghar and Prof. Jaime Correa

    ARC 110. Visual Studies. 3 Credit Hours.  
    Concurrent with the ARC 109 course, the visual studies course explores Architectural drawing as a means of discovery, exploration, analysis and representation. Coursework begins with freehand drawing, in which students explore and refine their observation and representational skills, followed by an introduction to digital drawing and 3-d fabrication used in the profession today. The students will develop a portfolio in digital format that illustrates the body of work produced during the three-week program.

    School of Architecture | Instructor(s): Prof. Yasmine Zeghar

    Maximum enrollment: 16
    Prerequisites(s): 9th and 10th grade English

  • Engineering Track B: Biomedical Engineering with Electrical and Computer Engineering – 6 Credit Hours

    Engineering Track B: Biomedical Engineering with Electrical and Computer Engineering  6 Credit Hours

    Explore topics in biomedical, electrical and computer engineering and gain an introductory understanding of the various disciplines. Students enroll in BME 100 and ECE 100.

    BME 100. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. 3 Credit Hours. 
    This course is designed to expose high school students to the main biomedical engineering topics along with its professional development options. The students are provided with lectures, visits, and hands-on experiences aimed to provide an introductory understanding of the discipline. The course includes topics on optics, medical imaging, biomaterials, microscopy, cellular engineering, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, and biomechanics. The course also includes a final design project in which the students design, fabricate and test a microcontroller based biomedical device.

    College of Engineering | Biomedical Engineering Department | Instructor(s): Dr. Ramon Montero

    ECE 100. Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering. 3 Credit Hours. 
    This course is an introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering and it covers three thematic units of the discipline: Electronics, Digital Systems and Signal Processing. Emphasis is on hands-on experience and the end of the course the student will learn how to construct and test electronics circuits, a digital voting machine and software for processing audio signals.

    College of Engineering | Electrical & Computer Engineering Department | Instructor(s): Dr. Sung Jin Kim, Dr. Nigel John

    Maximum enrollment: 12
    Prerequisites(s): Precalculus and physics are recommended but not required

  • Forensic Investigation, Crime Scene and Intelligence Analysis – 6 Credit Hours

    Forensic Investigation, Crime Scene and Intelligence Analysis  6 Credit Hours

    Discover life as a forensic anthropologist, crime specialist and analyst. Interact with law enforcement special agents, forensic anthropologists and forensic specialists to learn the method and process for answering the hidden reasons behind an individual's unnatural death. Meet professional intelligence analysts and discover careers paths in this exciting field. Students enroll in APY 100 and APY 200.

    APY 100. Introduction to Forensic Investigation. 3 Credit Hours. 
    Students will go into a virtual field platform to gain an introductory understanding about forensic investigation of a crime scene. Forensic investigation is the process of examination and identification surrounding a death from unnatural causes by law enforcement. Forensic investigation is accomplished through the knowledge of approaching a crime scene, gathering evidence, and analyzing all aspects of a crime scene. Join forensic firearm and fingerprint specialists to analyze “instruments of death and destruction” that caused the demise of the individual and uncover latent prints left at the crime scene establishing the identity of the perpetrator. Search the hidden secrets employed by forensic behavioral analysts who assist criminal investigations to provide behavioral assessments of unknown offenders, threat analyses, interviews, prosecutorial and trial strategies and ultimately expert testimony. Participate in the investigative technology available to law enforcement such as digital and cyber forensics by extracting information and data from computers, the Internet and following an individual’s digital footprint for the evidence essential in prosecuting cyber-crime. As our society has grown more complex, it has become more dependent on rules of law to regulate investigative activities. You will observe this first hand as we enter a virtual criminal courtroom. This course will take you from a crime scene to the courtroom. 

    College of Arts and Sciences | Dept. of Anthropology | Instructor(s): Prof. Monica Faraldo

    APY 200. Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours. 
    Students will learn the basics of the identification and analyses of the structure and function of the human skeleton and how it relates to Forensic Anthropology. Forensic Anthropology is the study of the recovery, identification, investigation, and analysis in a medicolegal context of human skeletal remains.  The class will include all 206 bones of the human skeleton, assessment for sex, age, stature, ancestry, and identity, demonstration of skeletal measurements, and determination of bone pathology and trauma. This exciting program will introduce you to the human skeleton, its features and characteristics necessary to determine sex, age, ancestry, time of death, and in the end, provide scientific evidence needed to assist law enforcement in their investigation of death and the identity of human remains. Follow the footsteps of the forensic archaeologist, discover and recover human skeletal remains. We will also look into some of the newest fields enlisting forensic science, which applies science to law and prepare you with the necessary skills to provide your results in a court of law. 

    College of Arts and Sciences | Dept. of Anthropology | Instructor(s): Prof. Monica Faraldo

    Maximum enrollment: 18
    Prerequisites(s): Biology and one other lab science

  • Infectious Diseases and Public Health – 6 Credit Hours

    Infectious Diseases and Public Health  6 Credit Hours

    Study public health principles and discover how our immune system works. Students enroll in BPH 200 and MIC 100.

    BPH 200. Introductory Public Health. 3 Credit Hours. 
    This course is a survey of the basic principles of public health. Topics that will be covered include an overview of the public health field and population health approach, evidence-based practice, health policy and ethics, communicable and non-communicable disease concepts and trends, the healthcare system and public health institutions, the physical and built environment, and various other topics that influence the health of populations.

    School of Nursing and Health Studies | Instructor(s): Dr. Ashley Falcon

    MIC 100. Introduction to Microbiology. 3 Credit Hours.  
    This is an introductory microbiology course for the summer scholars program. Microorganisms are in every facet of our lives and make up a microscopic world. Right now, your body is inhabited by over 40 trillion bacteria. Due to the evolution of our immune systems, we have been able to coexist with this world. It is when our immune systems weaken or when our otherwise healthy immune system encounters a particularly nasty pathogen that we become vulnerable. This course will cover the topics of how our immune system works, how microbial pathogens cause disease, how beneficial microbes protect us from disease, and some of the other activities perform that impact our world. The laboratory aspect of the course will provide you with invaluable knowledge in growing, staining, viewing and identifying microorganisms through the use of practical techniques and procedures. A Zoom presentation of your “unknown organism” will culminate what you have learned.

    College of Arts and Sciences | Dept. of Microbiology | Instructor(s): Prof. Roger WilliamsDr. Kurt Schesser

    Maximum enrollment: 30
    Prerequisites(s): Biology and one other lab science

  • Neuroscience and Public Health – 6 Credit Hours

    Neuroscience and Public Health  6 Credit Hours

    Study public health principles and the fundamentals of neuroscience. Students enroll in HCS 200 and NEU 100.

    BPH 200. Introductory Public Health. 3 Credit Hours. 
    This course is a survey of the basic principles of public health. Topics that will be covered include an overview of the public health field and population health approach, evidence-based practice, health policy and ethics, communicable and non-communicable disease concepts and trends, the healthcare system and public health institutions, the physical and built environment, and various other topics that influence the health of populations.

    School of Nursing and Health Studies | Instructor(s): Dr. Ashley Falcon

    NEU 100. Introduction to Neuroscience – From Molecules to Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.
    This course is designed to introduce students to fundamentals of neuroscience through lectures, interactive learning, and group projects. We will cover molecular mechanisms of basic neuroscience principles as they relate to health and disease. Students will gain an understanding of how nerve cells communicate with each other and form a network that controls our body. We will also discuss how scientific research is conduced and we will train students on how to design experiments.

    College of Arts and Sciences | Dept. of Neuroscience | Instructor(s): Dr. Laura Bianchi

    Maximum enrollment: 20
    Prerequisites(s): Biology and one other lab science 

  • Sport Administration – The Business of Sport – 6 Credit Hours

    Sport Administration – The Business of Sport  6 Credit Hours

    Study laws, regulations and management of intercollegiate and professional sports. Students enroll in KIN 100 and KIN 200. 

    KIN 100. Leadership and Ethics in Sport. 3 Credit Hours. 
    This course introduces students to the concepts of leadership, motivation, communication, and ethics in the field of sport administration. The course will include and combine theoretical foundations, exercises, activities, and projects designed for practical application of the leadership concepts. In addition, students will be exposed to industry leaders and networking opportunities through a variety of guest speakers.

    School of Education and Human Development | Dept. of Kinesiology & Sport Sciences | Instructor(s): Dr. Susan Mullane

    KIN 200. Sport Marketing and Finance. 3 Credit Hours.  
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to sport management as a professional endeavor. The class provides a broad overview of sport management by presenting extensive discussions of the foundational aspects of the profession and current topics from the sport industry. Students will have an introduction to the following components of the sport industry: professional development, interscholastic athletics, intercollegiate athletics, professional sports, marketing, sponsorship, event management & finance/economics.

    In both KIN 100 and KIN 200, students will be exposed to industry leaders and networking opportunities through a variety of guest speakers. Organizations that have provided executive speakers to the students have included: NASCAR, Miami Dolphins, Miami Marlins, Florida Panthers, Miami Heat, and UM Athletics.

    School of Education and Human Development | Dept. of Kinesiology & Sport Sciences | Instructor(s): Prof. Paul Resnick

    Maximum enrollment: 25
    Prerequisites(s): 9th and 10th grade English

  • Tropical Marine Biology with Shark Ecology and Conservation – 6 Credit Hours

    Tropical Marine Biology with Shark Ecology and Conservation  6 Credit Hours

    Explore the oceans, shark biology and marine conservation. Students enroll in MSC 107 and MSC 115.

    MSC 107. Life in the Sea. 3 Credit Hours. 
    Introduction to the oceans and their significance to mankind, encompassing geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes; man’s role in and on the sea, including fisheries, pollution, and ocean management.

    Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science | Dept. of Marine Biology & Ecology | Instructor(s): Dr. Chris Langdon

    MSC 105. Shark Behavioral Ecology and Conservation. 3 Credit Hours.
    Students will learn core concepts of shark behavioral ecology and key aspects of shark biology needed for the holistic understanding and study of shark behavioral ecology, including shark sensory, reproductive, physiological, movement and foraging ecology. These concepts will be used to link shark behavioral ecology to its consequences for conservation and management. 

    Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science | Dept. of Marine Biology & Ecology | Instructor(s): Dr. Neil Hammerschlag

    Maximum enrollment: 20
    Prerequisites(s): Biology and one other lab science.

UM Academies Remote Program | Two-Week, Non-Credit

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  • Business Academy – An Entrepreneurship Crash Course – Non-Credit

    Business Academy – An Entrepreneurship Crash Course  Non-Credit

    SSA 103. Business Academy – An Entrepreneurship Crash Course. Non-Credit. 
    This course is designed to expose students to the world of entrepreneurship, understand the fundamentals of business, and explore the ideas around startups.

    Students will learn the core concepts of design thinking, problem identification, innovation, customer development and best practices for problem solving. Guided by in-house and community experts, students will engage in project-based, experiential learning. 

    Students will also be trained on project management and exposed to cutting-edge digital tools to help students organize their ventures, prototype solutions and market their ideas. Students will be able to walk away with a skillset and mindset that will benefit their critical thinking in any professional area or career.

    Instructor(s): Peter Martinez

    Maximum enrollment: 25